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This day was not a waste

19 Mar

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Some days are harder than others. Today was a very sick day. I’ve worn my pajama sweatshirt all day. My hair is dirty and I couldn’t get a shower. I moved from my bed, to laying in the recliner. I entered a few contests and checked email. My husband made me lunch and I sat up on the couch to eat. Then, I laid down on the couch and watched some TV. I got up and made a very easy (5 minute) marinade for some chicken and stuck in the fridge. I felt so awful I went back to bed and watched some LOST. I got up and turned on the oven and put the chicken in to bake. I laid back down on the couch and wrote this blog.

I’m tempted to think this day was a total waste. But it wasn’t! This day was not a waste!

How can I say that? Every day, I know that I am loved and valued by God. And if the only thing that happens today is that I give my heart back to him in love and devotion, then my day has not been wasted.

 I will sing to the Lord as long as I live. I will praise my God to my last breath! ~Psalm 104:33

So all day long, when I was tempted to feel that this was a wasted day, I closed my eyes, and remembered how much I love God for loving me, and I mentally lifted my heart up to him in worship.

What an amazingly valuable lesson I have learned in the midst of a very difficult situation.

Blessings

9 Mar

God blesses those who are poor and realize their need for him  ~Matthew 5

Before I became ill with M.E., I always did all the menu planning and grocery shopping for our family of 5. We were often on the run with little league, musicals and ballet, but I always had meals planned and prepared for the family. Accomplishing this on a minimal budget was challenging, but I always found a way to make it work. I even got very good at planning a 2 week menu and doing one large shopping trip every 2 weeks.

As my illness progressed, it became harder and harder to do the grocery shopping. My husband started coming with me to help me out. Then I had to start using the stores electric scooter. Eventually, I just couldn’t do it anymore. And I had to leave it all up to him.

The thing about grocery shopping is that no matter how detailed you make the list, there are decisions that have to be made in the store. And he makes different choices than I do!

He would get home from shopping, and I would help him unpack the groceries, mumbling under my breath at every choice he made that was different from what I would have chosen if I had been able to shop. 

When I allowed this to frustrate me, it was hard on our relationship. He was doing his best, and I wasn’t so much frustrated with him, as I was with the fact that I didn’t get to make the choices any more. I wasn’t accepting the new fact that I needed him and I wasn’t embracing his willingness to add another huge chore onto his already long list. My eyes and thoughts were on what I was losing, not on what I was gaining.

Sometimes it’s overwhelming to realize how reliant I am upon other people, especially my husband. This imposed dependence has quite the potential to break down even a good relationship. The harder I try to hold onto independence, the more it challenges the relationship.

The same goes for my relationship with God. Living the last 12 years with M.E. has shown me just how much I need Him in my life. The more needy I become, the more I am blessed by God’s presence and activity in my life.

And just like my relationship with my husband, in order to experience those blessings, I have to let go of control and admit my needs. It’s only then that I can see the blessings of his provision and faithfulness.

This is just one of the things I am glad to have learned in this journey with M.E.

A Special Interview and HUGS for my Online Friends

Processing…slowly

25 Feb

I know you haven’t heard from me in several weeks. Mostly, that’s because I am processing some thoughts and feelings about my illness. And I process very slowly these days.

This picture of an old computer made me laugh. It brings back childhood memories and it’s a great representations of how my brain feels right now.

I’ll share that story soon, and share about our 30th anniversary celebration as well as some of the things I’ve processing as well. Stay tuned… and be patient… while. I. process.

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Keeping my eyes above the waves

28 Jan

As I struggle with some of the deepest crashes I ever have, this is my prayer!

“Spirit lead me where my trust is without borders
Let me walk upon the waters
Wherever You would call me”

Where do you Function?

27 Nov

This functionality test was developed by Dr. David Bell. He is the first doctor to confirm for me that I had M.E.

I’m curious – what is your normal function? And if you are not an M.E. patient, think about the last virus you caught (whether it was a bad cold or the flu) and tell me your “normal” function percent and  your “sickest day” function percent. How long did the “sickest day(s)” last? How long did it take you to get back up to your pre-sick function?

BELL Scale:

100: No symptoms with exercise. Normal overall activity. Able to work or do house/home work full time with no difficulty.

90: No symptoms at rest. Mild symptoms with physical activity. Normal overall activity level. Able to work full time without difficulty.

80: Mild symptoms at rest. Symptoms worsened by exertion. Minimal activity restriction needed for activities requiring exertion only. Able to work full time with difficulty in jobs requiring exertion.

70: Mild symptoms at rest. Some daily activity limitation clearly noted. Overall functioning close to 90% of expected except for activities requiring exertion. Able to work/do housework full time with difficulty. Needs to rest in day.

60: Mild to moderate symptoms at rest. Daily activity limitation clearly noted. Overall functioning 70% to 90%. Unable to work full time in jobs requiring physical labour (including just standing), but able to work full time in light activity (sitting) if hours are flexible.

50: Moderate symptoms at rest. Moderate to severe symptoms with exercise or activity; overall activity level reduced to 70% of expected. Unable to perform strenuous duties, but able to perform light duty or deskwork 4 – 5 hours a day, but requires rest periods. Has to rest/sleep 1-2 hours daily.

40: Moderate symptoms at rest. Moderate to severe symptoms with exercise or activity. Overall activity level reduced to 50-70% of expected. Able to go out once or twice a week. Unable to perform strenuous duties. Able to work sitting down at home 3-4 hours a day, but requires rest periods.

30: Moderate to severe symptoms at rest. Severe symptoms with any exercise. Overall activity level reduced to 50% of expected. Usually confined to house. Unable to perform any strenuous tasks. Able to perform deskwork 2-3 hours a day, but requires rest periods.

20: Moderate to severe symptoms at rest. Unable to perform strenuous activity. Overall activity 30-50% of expected. Unable to leave house except rarely. Confined to bed most of day. Unable to concentrate for more than 1 hour a day.

10: Severe symptoms at rest. Bed ridden the majority of the time. No travel outside of the house. Marked cognitive symptoms preventing concentration.

0: Severe symptoms on a continuous basis. Bed ridden constantly, unable to care for self.

For me, my normal hovers between the 20 and 30 percent.

I am not bed ridden, but my house quite small. It’s 20 steps from my bed to the bathroom. It’s 15 steps from the bathroom to my recliner. First thing in the morning, I go from bed, to bathroom to recliner and my husband brings me tea. I sit in the recliner all morning, getting up once to go back to the bathroom and make fresh tea.

It’s 15 steps from my recliner or couch to get to the kitchen. I spend my early afternoon prepping some dinner with many breaks in between to rest on the couch. Sometimes I can go into my spare bedroom to paint (10 steps from the couch). The hard part about painting is sitting upright… and the concentration. Most days, I can make a simple dinner for hubby and me. But he usually has to clean the kitchen. And some days, I just can’t and when he gets home from work, he has to make us dinner.

I usually get to leave the house once a week, though there have been periods of longer than 2 weeks when I haven’t left the house once. I always pay a price with sicker days after an outing. I am never without symptoms – even at rest. But I would not say they are always severe.

I am able to be on my computer for 2-3 hours a day with rest breaks, but I am not sitting upright. I am on the couch or in the recliner. And some days, I can’t concentrate enough to read more than a paragraph and I can’t write. Other days, I can write and read better.

So, I think hovering between 20-30% is a good estimation of my “normal”.

I’m looking forward to your responses. I hope many of you will answer the questions above, both my friends with M.E. and my friends without!

I can be broken and still Worship

10 Nov

This song is based on the story of Job in the Bible. My husband showed me a video created with the song and I was so moved. This could be my song – these could be my words.

Here’s the song with lyrics. You can search “Broken Praise” and see the video of Job from “The Story” on Youtube as well.

I raise my hands and shout “Hallelujah”

 

You travel to see a doctor?

19 Oct

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When I had been sick seven and half years, I’d been given 5 different diagnosis. I’d seen more than 16 different specialists in all kinds of areas (GI, Cardio, Rheum, Internal, EMT, neurologist etc. etc.). Finally, my husband and I got on a plane, traveled across the country to a doctor who finally gave me the diagnosis of ME/CFS. All of my previous diagnosis either mimicked or were a part of ME/CFS.

However, it wasn’t until 10 years after getting sick that I finally saw an immune specialist who could not only tell me what I had, but could show me the evidence on my lab work!

10 years!

But even now, almost 12 years of being sick, no one in the world can answer why ME/CFS patients have low Natural Killer cell count and function. No on can answer why the immune system is so off kilter. No one can explain why ME/CFS patients are the only ones whose cells can function on the first day of an exercise test, but can’t function on the second day!

I recently had a friend ask me “Why do you travel to see doctors if they don’t even help you?”

It was a blunt question. A question that hurt my heart. But I realized many of us face these kind of questions from friends and family – whether blunt, or insinuated.

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When the question was asked, I had several choices. I could A) respond with emotion B) defend myself or C) address the core issues of what was prompting this question.

Choice A leads me to a lot of places that are not healthy for me. I could be sarcastic or mean back. Or I could hang my head with hurt, shame or disappointment in my friend. I could go off and have a good cry and think about all the things I’ve lost. Or I could get angry because my life has been taken away and no one understands what my life is like now.

These are all of my first reactions. But not one of these responses does me any good. They all bring me down, make me a mean and nasty person, loose me a friend and leave me in despair.  And, they certainly do not help my friend understand my illness and situation, nor does it help her grow in having compassion for me or others in my situation. I want what is best, both for me AND for my friend.

Choice B is my next reaction. I am (or I used to be when I could think well) a very logical person. Yes, I am also an artist and quite emotional, but, when needed, I can usually choose to switch to logic and rely on it instead of my emotion. So, if I’m not going to choose the emotional response, I quickly start making my list of logical reasons that this is an unfair question. I begin defending myself.

Now, at face value, this seems that it might do me good. I’m standing up for my decisions. I’m defending my choices. I’m showing her what is what and who is who! And yet, the truth is, when I walk away from that conversation, I realize I was trying to convince myself as much as I was the other person. I start rethinking all my arguments and I become very insecure in the very fact that I had to defend myself. It makes me angry. Angry is not a good place to be.

It might do my friend a bit of good, if I had valid points that she listens to. But more likely, if she had good intentions, I hurt her feelings back. Revenge? No, that’s not a healthy place for me to be either. If she was truly being critical, than she will just walk away angry too. I’ve lost a friend, and we are both in a bad place.

Choice C is the only choice that leaves me in a healthy place and also gives her a shot at a better place too. So, what are some of the possible core issues that caused this question to arise?

Well, first of all, we have made science our God. Science must know everything. If you don’t understand something, the scientists will figure it out. And if it can’t be proven by science, it must not exist. So, one reason this question might be posed is out of an incorrect belief that every illness is understood and can be treated.

Secondly, we put way to much faith in doctors. They know everything there is to know, don’t they? I mean… if it is a verified illness, your doctor might not know how to treat it, but they’ve at least heard of it haven’t they? Well, actually, NO! They don’t, and they haven’t. So how is a doctor going to listen to my symptoms and send me to the right specialist to treat me if he/she has never heard of this illness?

Most people don’t understand that there are illness out there that can take years and years and years just to get the right diagnosis. And we don’t want to think about the possibility that there could be illnesses that no one knows how to treat.

The third thing I thought might have prompted this question is that most of us do not like to face that there are illnesses that are not yet curable. I’m not saying that we don’t know this fact, just that we don’t want to face this fact. It scares us!

It’s really difficult to think about the possibility that we, or someone we love, might have to face a lifetime of suffering. We want there to be a cure. That’s why football players wear pink in October. That’s why so much money and research has been put into the AIDS epidemic. That’s why there are colored awareness ribbons in every color of the rainbow.

But this year, I have had to face the truth that there is not a cure out there for me. And if there is not a cure, then I have to learn to live the very best life I can with this illness!

From my friends perspective, she wonders why I’m not getting better. From my perspective, I have gotten better. I am better at understanding and managing my symptoms. I am better at staying positive and joyful. I am better at being patient through the hard days and making the best of the better days.

So what did I answer my friend?

I told her there aren’t any doctors who know and understand my illness in my part of the country. And I told her that the doctors I travel to see, help me manage my symptoms the best I can.

It’s as simple as that and I left it there. I hope I helped my friend. I know I helped me.

Dealing with a GP flare

5 Oct
Clear liquids: jello, broth and ginger ale

Clear liquids: jello, broth and ginger ale

My week started out good! Fall weather, an autumn candle, my favorite fall music. And then, WHAMO! Tuesday morning at 1:00AM I was hit with a severe GP Flare!

My ME/CFS illness involves a lot of dysautonomia – a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. This is the part of our central nervous system that regulates all of our automatic body functions, including digestion. GP is short for Gastroparesis, the slow emptying of the stomach. It can be caused by a variety of things, but in my case, it’s because my ANS (autonomic nervous system) is not functioning properly.

A flare can involve pain in the upper stomach or near my belly button, nausea, and at it’s worst, vomiting and diarrhea.

This week, I’ve been dealing with one of the worst flares I’ve had in several years! I can not explain why. I just have to roll with the punches.

Sometimes I can feel my stomach slowing down and I know I have to be very careful about the things I’m eating, even going to “Boost” for some meals, until it feels better again. This time however, it was one of those that hits without warning! I awoke in the middle of the night to that recognizable pain followed by vomiting the dinner I eaten 8 hours earlier. It should have left my stomach by that time, but this is the problem with GP – the food sits there instead of being digested.

I’m sorry if that’s too descriptive for some of you who are reading, but I know that there are others with ME/CFS dealing with this too. But since I was lucky enough to end up at the Mayo clinic for a diagnosis, and with a great GI who has helped me deal with it at home rather than the hospital, I want others to be able to read my experiences and maybe glean something helpful.

So I thought I would share some of the steps I’ve gone through this week. I am not out of the woods yet – I’m afraid this is going to be a long one.

Step 1: My first step is to go to a completely clear liquid diet. My goal is to stay hydrated without needing IV fluids.  However, there have been times that it is so bad I needed to stop putting anything at all in my stomach. In those times, my GI will order 1-2 days of IV fluids at home to see if we can move into oral fluids. If I can’t, I have to head to the hospital.

There aren’t many different flavors when it comes to clear liquids. Clear juices, clear broth, and jello. I also like a good ginger ale, because the ginger can reduce the nausea. This time I also included some coconut water for electrolytes.

This step can last a day to a week or more!

Full liquid: pudding, broth and soda crackers

Full liquid: pudding, broth and soda crackers

Step 2:  If I’m tolerating the clear liquids well, I move to a full liquid diet. This means things still need to be liquid, but can include cream of wheat, cream of chicken soup, pudding or custard. If I’m doing well, I may include a few soda crackers. Sometimes I try this too soon, and I have to go back to clear liquids.  I also add in Boost or Instant Breakfast. (I have also heard “Orgain” is MUCH better for us than boost, but I haven’t tried it yet)

DSCN3768I was told at Mayo, that one could basically live off Boost and almost off Instant Breakfast. They both have a lot of sugar though, and I get pretty tired of the flavors after a while. I drink vanilla boost and chocolate Instant Breakfast so I can alternate the taste. (straws in my drinks and my Boost help me to sip slowly put smaller amounts in my stomach.)

As this full liquid diet goes on, I am usually anxious to chew something. So I often send my hubby to the store for some gummy bears and caramels. This time around he also bought me some jelly bellies which has been really fun for a unique flavor while not really sending anything into my stomach!

My coconut ginger rice

My coconut ginger rice

Step 3: If I’m tolerating the full liquid diet, I add in rice. I have created a rice dish that I love and that I enjoy at this stage. I put a full cup of coconut milk with a cup of water and 3/4 cup of rice. I also chop up a couple pieces of candied ginger. Then I cook the rice in this. The coconut oils in the coconut milk seem to be the best fat for me to start with and the ginger helps with nausea. Sometimes I put a little honey over it. (I made some for this picture thinking I was ready, but it’s going to have to wait in the fridge a while longer)

Step 4: At this point, if I’m doing well, I’m usually getting very hungry. (This can be anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks) I slowly add in soft foods like applesauce, toast, and scrambled egg. Once I can eat toast and scrambled egg, I’m usually back to my careful GP diet.

This time around, I’ve tried to get to the full liquid diet a couple of times. I’m not tolerating it very well, so after 5 days of  clear liquids and a little bit of full liquids, I am not dehydrated, but I am feeling very weak and dizzy. I’m sure the lack of eating doesn’t help all the other issues of my immune disorders and dysautonomia.

This website, Gastroparesis Diet, was very helpful in figuring out these steps. The other part is just listening really carefully to my body and going very slowly, backing up if I’ve moved forward too fast, and being patient.

If you have ME/CFS and you have periods of pain and nausea, you might think through trying my steps and read the website above for food ideas. The truth is, many of us have Gastroparesis or transient Gastroparesis. You don’t need to go through all the testing to see if these ideas and the diet above will help. Remember though, that just because a food may be tolerated by most GP’ers, it may not be one you can tolerate.

Now, many of you may be thinking, “Aren’t there any medications you can take?”

Well, yes, I do take one regularly that helps a lot with motility, but it doesn’t prevent the flares. I had a dystonic reaction to the most common one, Reglan, so I am on a less common one. I can have a flare when I eat the wrong thing, or I can have a flare for unknown reasons. But in general the motility medication does help.

There are medications for stomach cramping that a GI can prescribe, and they help in less severe flares, but I don’t find them helpful in these severe situations. Pain medications are a catch 22. They reduce the pain, and they decrease the motility. So, though I may be out of pain, they may make my GP worse. These are a last resort medication.

Nausea medications are wonderful because they help me stay on the liquids and avoid the IV’s or hospital. However, I have been warned that the most common one, Phenergan, is not good for those with dysautonomia. They mess up the ANS even more. And they make me really sleepy! I prefer Zofran – which works very well for me and doesn’t put me to sleep. It doesn’t stop my stomach from purging a meal that won’t digest, but when it’s empty, it does help me keep liquids down, if I sip slowly!

I hope this helps some of you, who also struggle with ME/CFS , figure out how to deal with some of your stomach issues. And for my friends who are just “trying to get it” – thank you for bearing with me and hearing about one of the most unpleasant flares I get.

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A trip to….

30 Sep

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A trip to the beach? Well… yes… and no. I LOVE the beach! Hot, cold, windy, humid… whatever! I love the beach! Lucky for me, my Immune Specialist has a clinic near the beach!

It’s been a long process to get back to see her again. New clinic, new scheduling, and once again, the difficulty of travel.

I started out 48 hrs before we left, infusing IV saline fluids. It increases my blood volume and gives me that little bit of  “umph” to get up and… well … walk!

But this time we took my wheelchair. We were traveling standby and we weren’t sure how long we might have to wait or how many different airports we might have to go through to get to our destination. I have a wheelchair that is a little lighter and the feet lift up like a recliner (the back doesn’t recline though). This helps a lot with the amount of energy I expend even when sitting upright with my feet down.

I’m very lucky, and have a very special husband who took care of me and all of the details of the flights and transfers. We traveled light so our bags could go on my lap and Bill pushed me through the airports. He dealt with the check in desks, figured out our next flight option and made sure he provided me with things to drink. So, besides taking care of my physical needs, the trip was very low stress, for me.

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We got up in the middle of the night to head to the airport. Now, of course, I don’t sleep well, so waking up early was really no issue for me. In the picture to the left, we were waiting to see if there were seats on the first flight.

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On the right, here we are a couple hours later. We’d missed out on the first 2 flights and were deciding what our next try was. Surprisingly, we got on right at the last minute! We were in the back row, which doesn’t recline much. I had done and taken everything I could to keep the blood flowing up to my head. I made it through the flight, though I was very tired by the time we got to the next airport. I also find there are moments where it’s hard to breathe for a moment or two. I think the cabin pressure and the reduced oxygen really affects me.

We got right on the next flight and were even in extra comfort seats with a row of 3 seats to ourselves so I did a lot of changing positions, and even laid down across the seats for a part of the flight. I can NOT sleep on an airplane.

By the time we landed, I was pretty close to tears. My body ached and I was exhausted. It was midnight and we still had to get a car and navigate through a city we don’t know. But we did it. Got to the bed and breakfast we stayed at last year and dropped into bed!

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I did get some time in the sun, on the beach, on each side of the appointment. Yippee!!! I am so happy in the sun and sand!

We were at the doctors office for over six hours. We had a very worthwhile appointment with a doctor that is doing all she can to advance the understanding and treatment of ME/CFS. My husband had done an amazing job of organizing the appointment ahead of time. So we sped through the things that were less important to me and were able to focus on my priorities. He also furiously took notes as she talked which is invaluable as I can only really remember about half of the appointment.

I have found a real shift in my goals and expectations from these appointments. I spent many years looking for “the pill” that would get me back to my happy busy life. Then I spent more years looking for the combination of pills that might allow me to function closer to normal.

Now, I am really learning to embrace my life as it is. As pathetic as it may look from the outside or compared to my pre-illness life, it is the God given life I have and it’s better to be happy and content during it, than continue to wish for all things I can no longer have. So I was looking to calm and control the most bothersome symptoms, while also learning to adapt and adjust my life to living with them.

So instead of looking for what will make me “well”, we discussed the symptoms that hold me down the most. And I am going to go back and try a medication I tried early in my illness to control my POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome). But instead of expecting it to fix me, I am just looking to have a little more control over one problem.

We did also discuss some larger picture ideas, but at this point, nothing is fully proven, so it’s trial and error with lots of possible side effects and very high costs. So these are being mulled over while we focus on having some influence over individual symptoms.

I felt really good about this. It doesn’t give me false hope and allows me to continue to focus my mind and heart on peace and contentment in God and life. But I can also watch the current research as it slowly progresses and I do have some “big gun” treatments I can pray about. If God provided the resources and I felt it was the right step to try, we might move that direction.

DSCN3735In the meantime, I said goodbye to the sun for the next 9 months. We arrived home and summer was definitely over! It’s hard because fall and winter are my worst seasons, but, I must admit, I am enjoying my Autumn candles and yummy apple treats!

A Special Interview and HUGS for my Online Friends

Having Fun is Serious Stuff

9 Sep
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Getting ready for the Packers opening game

I’ve always loved football. From the time I was a little girl, growing up in Stanford, attending games with my dad, I’ve loved football. I can remember being 8 or 9 and sitting out on the lawn, doing cartwheels and listening to the stadium sounds. I would try to keep track of the game based on the sounds, cheering and cannons. Yep… these were the days way before internet and cell phone updates keep us up to speed.

Before getting sick, I still loved football, but I rarely had the time to sit down and enjoy an uninterrupted 4 hours of game on the TV. But when life slowed down because my body couldn’t keep up, I really started enjoying football again!

Though I loved football, I’ve never really had an NFL team that was “my” team. I just loved the game. That changed the day I first saw Aaron Rodgers play. He was still the back up to Brett Favre, but as I watched the game, I saw something really unique in his play… something I really liked. It piqued my interested, and so the next season, when he became the starter, I watched every Green Bay game I could. By the end of the season, I was an Aaron Rodgers fan. Then I started reading about the Packers, getting know the team and the coaches. I loved what I saw and became not only a Rodgers fan, but a Packers Fan! It’s been, what 6 years now? And a Super Bowl trophy? Yeah, I’ve now found my team…I’m a Packers fan for life. Not one of those “only when they win” fans… through thick and thin, I will be a Packers fan!

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Packer themed eyeshadow

People laugh and wonder how I can put so much time into football. But you know, when you suffer all day long physically,  having some fun is really serious stuff! I no longer take it for granted, and though it often costs me physically, I love  opportunities to have a little fun!

I found this Packers eyeshadow idea on Pinterest this summer. So I purchased a few little sample eyeshadows from a seller on Etsy. Yesterday, for my first Packers game of the season, I got dressed up in my #12 jersey and put on make up! Cute, eh?

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It’s a civil war – Packer Mom and 49er Son

We lost… but it was a great game! Lots of really good playing, some mistakes (including one that may have cost us the game) and lots to cheer for! (I should probably mention here that this first game was a civil war… my hubby and son are 49er fans)

Lots of fun… and lots of energy output… leads to several sick days. Yeah…. I take having fun very seriously. “Fun” is not always easy to find these days, and it costs a lot.

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PJ day and couch time – it’s the M.E./CFS life!

 

 

I don’t really like showing pictures of me feeling sick… but in comparison to the picture at the top before yesterday’s game, this is me today. I’m in my PJ pants and tee, spending the day on the couch watching LOST. And this afternoon I’ll watch the U.S. Open! It’s taken me quite a few years to learn to enjoy watching tennis instead of playing it. But I do! And Djokovic is the Aaron Rodgers of tennis!!

Yes, I sat up to write this post, but then I had to lay down again. My throat hurts (not from cheering, but from whatever it is in M.E. that causes viral symptoms). My head hurts. I have the chills. I’m dizzy. My feet are cold and numb and burn all at the same time. My body aches.

Am I complaining? Not at all! I take having fun seriously. I choose it, I enjoy it and then I pay for it. That’s the way this life works.  That’s Myalgic Enchephalmyelitis! But it sure makes me appreciate having fun!! (grin)

Kreativ Blogger Award - Seven Things I Love

and Have Fun!

 

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